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About Marin
Belvedere

Belvedere

Surrounded on three sides by San Francisco Bay, Belvedere consists of two islands — the larger being Belvedere Island, the smaller being Corinthian Island (which is shared with neighboring Tiburon and connected to Tiburon by causeway)— and a lagoon (Belvedere Lagoon) situated between the two islands. Narrow, winding roads circle the two islands, with hedges and lush foliage along the route, and momentarily opening onto spectacular water views. 

Although the both Belvedere and Tiburon have become very much alike, with their premier real estate prices motivated by spectacular views, they grew up differently. There were distinct differences between the towns; while Belvedere was home to the rich; Tiburon, in its days as home base for a railroad, was considered ‘the other side of the tracks.’ 

Belvedere celebrated its 100th year as a city in 1996. Marin’s smallest incorporated community is also one of the most exclusive. There is just enough room for some of the most expensive homes in Marin and the historic San Francisco Yacht Club. 

Belvedere is a treasure trove of different architectural styles; from the tremendous Queen Anne and Mission Revival homes of the late 1800’s to more modern Japanese-style and Mediterranean villas. The two elementary schools and one middle school in the local Reed Union School District are rated in the top one percent among California schools. 

Belvedere, which translates in Italian to ‘beautiful view’, was well and aptly named, with exceptional views of San Francisco Bay, the Golden Gate Bridge, Angel Island, and Belvedere Lagoon. The beauty is quite breathtaking.

Corte Madera

Corte Madera

Corte Madera is located in central Marin. Incorporated in 1916, the town extends from San Francisco Bay on the east side of Highway 101 to Mt. Tamalpais on the west. Home options include low-lying, level properties close to the water and fabulous outdoor malls, hillside properties overlooking the bay, or hillside homes tucked in amongst the many trees; all have access to a fabulous network of biking trails and excellent hiking nearby.

Corte Madera occupies an area of four square miles of land, plus surrounding water tidelands. It is within hiking, biking and driving distance of some of the most beautiful vistas in the western United States. The town reflects the easy, outdoor lifestyle long associated with California, with open space, and parks in every direction. In Corte Madera you will find a magical blend of contrasts, from its rural, sprawling hillsides and bordering waterways to its cosmopolitan, fashionable homes and businesses.

Fairfax

Fairfax

Fairfax was originally part of a Spanish land grant conferred to Domingo Sais in 1839. Sais gave the area now known as the Marin Town & Country Club to Marin County's first physician, Alfred Taliaferro of Virginia, who subsequently passed the property along to fellow Virginian Charles Snowden Fairfax. Lord Fairfax, tenth Baron of Cameron, Scotland, moved here with his wife Ada in 1855, lured west by gold fever. 

After the death of Charles Fairfax, the property changed hands, eventually becoming the site of the renowned Pastori's Restaurant in the 1890's. Madame Pastori, once a singer at La Scala in Milan, Italy, was visited in Fairfax by many great figures in the opera world. The restaurant, which was rebuilt on a grander scale after a fire in 1911, still stands. 

Convenient railroad service early in this century made Fairfax a favorite weekend and summer retreat for city dwellers. Fairfax Park hosted thousands on weekends. Fairfax was the setting for dozens of early Western movies from 1910 to the early 1920's. Construction of Alpine Dam in 1917 brought a large Italian population to the area, adding to Fairfax's colorful history. 

Fairfax came of age in February of 1931 when the town was incorporated as a city with a five-member council government. Fairfax today, with a diverse population of 7,000, is a community of fine neighborhoods nestled in the hills and small valleys of the Upper Ross Valley. Located 16 miles north of San Francisco, within easy reach of numerous State and National Recreation Areas, Fairfax offers the best of both work and play while retaining its small-town atmosphere and charm. Two of our Cal Land Title employees live in Fairfax and they absolutely love it!

Greenbrae

Greenbrae

Greenbrae is a small, though well-traveled area of Marin County. Located adjacent to U.S. Highway 101 at the opening of Ross Valley, this address encompasses parts of the City of Larkspur, as well as some unincorporated county land. Predominantly composed of either hillside or waterfront terrain, its homes and offices are known for their views of San Francisco Bay, Corte Madera Creek, and Mount Tamalpais.

Greenbrae’s neighborhoods are bordered by Downtown Larkspur to the south, Larkspur Landing to the east, the unincorporated area of Kentfield to the west, and the City of San Rafael to the north. Straddling Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, its most frequented points of interest include Marin General Hospital, Bon Air Shopping Center, and the Marin Rowing Association Boathouse.

Greenbrae
Kentfield

Kentfield

Because the town of Kentfield is unincorporated, it is governed by the Marin County Board of Supervisors, who are known to pay close attention to the wishes of the residents, especially concerning development. An upper middle class to wealthy community, Kentfield is nestled at the base of Mt. Tam, bordered by Larkspur and Ross. 

The name "Kentfield" is taken from the family of Albert Kent, a Chicago meat packer who, along with his wife Adaline, settled in the area in 1872. Adaline donated twenty-three acres of land for a community recreation center; which later became the site for the College of Marin, which is part of the California Community College system. Albert and Adaline's son William, who became a U.S. congressman and an ardent conservationist, donated Muir Woods as a national park. 

The homes in this area are generally set well back from the streets which meander among pine, redwood and manzanita. The low-profile roofs of these spacious homes, mostly set on large lots, are designed to blend in with the natural surroundings and offer a wooded, country feeling. 

Larkspur

Larkspur

The wife of a major developer, Charles Wright, named this beautiful area for the lupine she found there, mistakenly identifying it as larkspur. The downtown/Magnolia Avenue area is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as an irreplaceable American “turn of the century home town.” Larkspur residents have been quite successful in preserving the small-town ambience.

Larkspur extends north to the unincorporated area of Greenbrae, home to the Bon Air Shopping Center, which offers boutiques, restaurants and gift shops. Greenbrae is well known for its tastefully landscaped custom homes, many of which have views of the bay, Corte Madera Creek and lowlands, and Mt. Tamalpais. A special effort was made during the development of this area to preserve the hundreds of majestic oak trees that grace the hillsides. Greenbrae residents enjoy a one-minute drive to the freeway and two minutes to the Larkspur Landing Ferry Terminal.

Mill Valley

Mill Valley

The history of Mill Valley began with John Reed. Subsequent to the acquisition of a large land grant in 1834, Reed built a sawmill in 1836 on Cascade Creek to provide wood for the construction of his house. The mill, which gave Mill Valley its name, is now restored and stands among the towering redwoods in Old Mill Park, a few blocks from downtown. Nestled at the foot of Mt. Tamalpais, only ten miles from San Francisco, Mill Valley became a favorite vacation spot for wealthy city dwellers. In 1896 a mountain railway, nicknamed “The Crookedest Railroad in the World,” carried passengers from town to the mountain’s summit and to Muir Woods. Although the tracks were removed in 1930, the Old Railroad Grade is currently very popular with hikers and bikers.

Shortly after the town was incorporated in 1900, two town traditions began. The Outdoor Art Club was founded in 1902, a group whose purpose was, and still is, to preserve the beauties of Mill Valley. The Dipsea Race was first run in 1905 and has been held almost every year since. It is the second oldest race in the country, behind the Boston Marathon. The race is 7.1 miles long, from Lytton Square in Mill Valley over Mt. Tamalpais to Stinson Beach. The Fall Arts Festival is one of the cultural events that occur in Mill Valley each year. It is the longest running festival in the county, celebrating its 61st year in 2013. The Mill Valley Film Festival, also held in the fall, draws thousands of film enthusiasts and artists from around the world. Bordered on three sides by the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Muir Woods National Monument, Mt. Tamalpais State Park and watershed, Mill Valley offers spectacular recreational opportunities.

Novato

Novato

The City of Novato, one of the Bay Area's premier communities, is located in Marin County 29 miles north of San Francisco. Novato is the second largest city in the county. Incorporated in 1960 and encompassing 43 square miles with 3,500 acres of open space and parks, Novato is an agreeable mixture of a variety of neighborhoods. Waterfront communities, horse farms, and beautiful mansions are all part of the eclectic collection that is Novato. 

Novato began as Rancho de Novato, a Spanish land grant given in 1839 to Fernando Feliz, but its roots are far deeper. 

Olompali State Historical Park, just north of the city, is named for a key Miwok settlement, Olemaloke, that dates to 1300. Scholars debate the significance of an Elizabethan coin found nearby. Did it belong to Sir Francis Drake's crew that hit the coast in 1579. 

The only battle of the Bear Flag Rebellion, which led to California's statehood, was fought at Olompali in 1846, and the Burdell family later established the first formal garden in Marin there in the 1870's. 

The Chosen Family hippie commune serenaded by Janis Joplin and the Grateful Dead lived in the old Burdell mansion until it burned in 1969. 

Hamilton Field, on the southeast side of the city, served as an Army airfield from 1935 to 1947 and continued military operations to 1975. After years of wrangling, Hamilton opened in 1999 as a community of new homes. Cal Land's Novato office is located at 7250 Redwood Blvd, Suite 208. 

Novato is largely a bedroom community - more than 7,600 students are enrolled in the Novato Unified School District but the city also has made its mark in business and industry. Shopping in Novato ranges form the traditional stores and boutiques on Grant Avenue in "Old Town" to the Vintage Oaks Shopping Center. 

The city is home to Fireman's Fund Insurance, the county's largest private employer with about 2,500 workers. The nonprofit Buck Institute for Research in Aging, located in a striking complex on the slopes of Mount Burdell, is on the leading edge of biomedical research and the science of aging. 
 

Novato

School Links
Novato School District 

STAR Reports
Novato Unified School District 

Demographics
Total population: 47,630
Total housing units: 18,975
Median household income: $76,146

Ross

Ross

In 1857 a Scotsman from San Francisco, James Ross, bought a large Mexican land grant named Rancho Punta de Quentin, which extended from what is now Corte Madera to Red Hill in San Anselmo. In the town that bears his name, Ross built his home on the property that is now the Marin Art and Garden Center; a beautiful ten-acre site that, in addition to housing several non-profit community groups, also offers many classes and activities. Shaded roads and lanes enhance this lovely town of grand estates and luxury custom homes. Large properties in park-like settings often have accommodations for horses, as well as tennis courts and swimming pools.

Centered on the Ross Common is a small, very quaint commercial area featuring restaurants and shops. Until 2011, the same family operated one enterprise, the Ross Grocery, since Word War II. Residents are universally proud of, and offer support to, the local elementary school. In 1991, Child Magazine named Ross Elementary School as one of the top ten schools in the nation. The academic ranking is in the 99th percentile, the highest any school can achieve. Ross, often characterized as the suburban ideal, can easily be portrayed as a bastion of gracious living.

San Anselmo

San Anselmo

San Anselmo is a charming community of older homes amid diverse architectural styles, on shady, tree-lined streets. The downtown area is very “small town” in appearance, but offers a variety of shops and restaurants. In the 1870’s, what is now known as The Hub in San Anselmo was the spot where a spur track to San Rafael was added to the Sausalito-Tomales run of the Pacific Coast Railroad. San Anselmo was incorporated in 1907.

The most visible landmark in town, a beautiful stone castle that overlooks San Anselmo, is actually the San Francisco Theological Seminary, established in 1892 to train Presbyterian clergy. San Anselmo Avenue, the town’s main shopping area, is a curving boulevard of awning-shaded shops, cafes, galleries, restaurants, and boutiques. The Annual Art and Wine Festival, the Antique Dealers Fair, and the Country Fair Day, are all very well attended by local citizens. San Anselmo also boasts one of the County’s most successful community volunteer programs.

San Anselmo

School Links
San Anselmo School District
Tamalpais Union High School District (Includes Drake High and Redwood High) 

STAR Reports
Tamalpais Union High School District (Includes Drake High and Redwood High) 

Demographics
Total population: 12,378
Total housing units: 5,408
Median household income: $85,778

San Rafael

San Rafael

Mission San Rafael Arcangel was established on Dec. 14, 1817, by Father Prefect Vicente Francisco de Sarria, three other friars, and an escort of soldiers. Although the buildings are replicas, a treasure trove of historical artifacts can be seen in the museum. Marin’s premier city San Rafael, is the oldest and largest city in the county and it is also the seat of county government. Marin’s second most popular tourist spot (after Muir Woods), the Frank Lloyd Wright Civic Center, was the last major structure and the only government building designed by the world famous architect. It is now a national historic landmark.

Other notable places to visit are China Camp State Park, which rims a picture perfect shoreline and is wonderfully secluded, yet only minutes from town; the lovely Dominican College campus, founded in 1888; and the Falkirk Cultural Center, a handsomely preserved, 17-room Victorian mansion that is set on 11 acres of formal grounds just a block from downtown. San Rafael offers a wide assortment of housing; from Peacock Gap’s Golf and Country Club contemporary homes and condominiums overlooking the Bay, to spacious traditional homes in the prestigious Dominican section. San Rafael has 14 parks, yacht clubs, outstanding docking and launching facilities, tennis / swim clubs and bicycle trails. It is truly a community where families can enjoy an active lifestyle and partake of a rich historical and cultural heritage.

San Rafael

School Links
San Rafael School District
Dixie School District 

STAR Reports
San Rafael City Elementary District 
Dixie Elementary District 

Demographics - 2000 census
Total population: 56,063
Total housing units: 22,948
Median household income: $73,178

Sausalito

Sausalito

Beautiful and unique homes ornament wooded hills that fall steeply to Richardson Bay. Condominium apartments offer marvelous views of San Francisco and the Bay. Regular ferry service from San Francisco makes the town easily accessible for both commuters and tourists. Located on the southeastern tip of Marin, just across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco, Sausalito was first settled in the mid-19th century and incorporated in 1893, making it one of the oldest established communities in the North Bay region. Early Spanish explorers named the area “Saucelito” for the “little willow trees” they found growing along its streams and underground springs.

The Sausalito of today, a colorful waterfront town framed by steeply ascending hills, reminds many of a Mediterranean fishing village. Bounded on three sides by Richardson Bay and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, it has grown little over the years, still occupying a land area of just 2-1/4 square miles. This unique urban village has long been a popular visitor destination, known worldwide for its natural beauty, its incomparable arts community, the variety of unique shops and restaurants, and its easy accessibility from San Francisco by bridge and ferry. It is also a prized residential and business location, boasting temperate climate, old world charm, and some of the region’s most spectacular views.

Tiburon

Tiburon

What is now the Tiburon peninsula was, in the beginning, home to at least fifty Indian villages. Shell mounds, petroglyphs on the rock face of Ring Mountain, and the occasional find of mortars and cooking stones are testimony to this portion of Tiburon’s history. John Reed established his rancho on the lands where Mill Valley, Belvedere, Tiburon, San Quentin, and Corte Madera are now. In addition to his thriving cattle herds, Reed also established salt yards, a brickyard, and a stone quarry. In the 1880s, the coming of the broad-gauge railroad transformed the peninsula. The town was created as a result of the railroad, and a long line of ferries carried passengers and rail cars the six miles across the bay to San Francisco.

The first elegant homes were built, mostly by wealthy San Franciscans, as summer retreats. Main Street Tiburon was rebuilt twice after being laid waste by fire. Incorporated in 1964, Tiburon is now a beautiful enclave of historical landmarks, parks, restaurants and shopping areas. The residential architecture is a mix of small cottages, many of them beautifully remodeled, contemporary showplaces located in the hills with spectacular views, and sensational examples of engineering that jut out over the water. The San Francisco and Corinthian Yacht Clubs provide berths for hundreds of sailboats for local yachtsmen; public and private tennis and swimming facilities are also available to residents.

Tiburon

School Links
Reed Union School District
Tamalpais Union High School District (Includes Drake High and Redwood High) 

STAR Reports
Reed Union Elementary District 
Tamalpais Union High School District (Includes Drake High and Redwood High) 

Demographics - 2000 census
Total population: 8,667
Total housing units: 3,893
Median household income: $127,896

West Marin

West Marin

The West Marin area is, debatably, the most spectacular region in a county known for its scenic wonders. A truly rural section of Marin encompassing miles of open ridge tops, wild coast lines, and pastoral dairy farms, this area is home to such diverse wildlife as gray whales, tule elk, elephant seal, bobcat, fox, hundreds of bird species and the occasional mountain lion. Containing the Point Reyes National Seashore and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, almost all of West Marin is protected. 

With the exception of Inverness, which is on the Point Reyes Peninsula, the coastal towns, from southernmost Muir Beach, going north through Stinson Beach, Bolinas, Olema, Pt. Reyes Station, Marshall and Tomales, dot Highway One all the way up to the Marin/ Sonoma County border. The small inland hamlets of Nicasio, Woodacre, Forest Knolls, San Geronimo and Lagunitas are all unique and remarkably beautiful in their various settings that range from redwood forests to open grasslands and rolling hills. 

Experienced Insiders Master Negotiators

Belvedere
The Team

We understand the role EMOTION plays in buying & selling a home

San Anselmo
The Team

McArthur Love consistently ranks in the top 1% of Marin County Realtors.  Their success is your success.  Tina McArthur & Victoria Love are experienced insiders and master negotiators who always have their finger on the pulse of the Marin market – one of the most competitive real estate markets in the world.

They are both experts at strategically pricing and positioning properties to achieve the highest and best price for their sellers.  Their extensive personal contacts and active participation in several Marin networking groups gives them a decisive advantage in finding buyers their ideal home – often before it comes to market.

Tina and Victoria have earned the respect of their clients and colleagues through honest, transparent, decisive and strategic negotiating.  They love what they do, and that’s apparent.

If there’s a deal to be done, McArthur Love will do it.

Consistently ranked in the top 1% of Marin County Realtors

More than 40 years of combined experience

Over $100 million in properties sold in 2015 and 2016

Tina McArthur

A San Francisco native and one of Marin County’s most trusted and established agents, Tina has a deep respect for the history and quality of life that is uniquely Marin. Her work on several non-profit boards including Marin Theatre Company, Ritter Center and the Lark Theater, underscores her commitment to the Marin community. Tina and her husband, Richard Rubenstein, a neurologist, live in Larkspur.  Visit Tina's website.

Victoria Love

Victoria earned a BA with honors and a Master’s Degree from Columbia University. She was an award winning copywriter on Madison Avenue and then worked for years as a licensed psychotherapist. Victoria comes from a real estate family in New York City and has in-depth experience with home design and renovation. Victoria and her husband, Greg Rowan, a creative director, have college-age children who attended schools in both Marin and San Francisco.  Visit Victoria's website.  

Testimonials

We recently bought a home through Tina and Victoria and it was a miraculously easy experience. They are impeccably honest, knowledgeable, and thorough, and they share the gift of listening to the client. No detail is too small and no drama is too large for them to handle swiftly and tactfully. The question arises…do they ever sleep?

– B. Bonfigli & M. Preston, Buyers, 2016

All bases were covered with this amazing team…from spot on pricing, strategy, creative marketing and negotiating…that yielded a record breaking result.  What a difference it makes to work with such pros!

– P. Burnham, Seller, 2016

Tina and Victoria were impressive. They were very knowledgeable about the market, were able to move quickly and stay on top of the smallest details…with both professionalism and a sense of humor. We have no doubt in our minds that we were able to achieve top dollar for our home based on their reputation, skill and experience. We are so grateful!

– J. & J. Bernabei, Sellers, 2016

Working with Tina and Victoria was truly a pleasure.  Tina and Victoria guided us through the process of selling our house with expertise, creativity and love.  We were thrilled with the outcome, as our home sold quickly above asking price.  Throughout selling and buying, we had the utmost confidence in Tina and Victoria, always feeling listened to, supported, and that we had access to every option both on and off the market.  We would highly recommend Tina and Victoria to anyone looking for an agent. 

– C. & N. Kenig, Sellers & Buyers, 2016

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  Tina: 415-250-5221    Victoria: 415-377-4370

Kentfield